How Pesticides are Killing Bees: Watch the Video

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Bees Capping the Honey

Bees Capping the Honey

#redhousehoney. Bees are dying by the 1000s. Watch this video to see where, how and why: http:youtu.be/Sa6Jul0CDc0. Hundreds of thousands of bees are dying in Ontario alone each year due to the use of neonicotinoids–nicotine-based pesticides.  However, proponents of the pesticide retaliate again these charges saying it is beekeepers who mismanage stocks. Huh?

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Red House Honey at Jacobsons Gourmet Food Concepts on Beechwood

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Red House Honey comes to Jacobsons Gourmet Concepts on Beechwood Avenue in Ottawa! Look for Jacobson’s Gourmet Concept Raw Honey on the shelves.

Jacobsons on Beechwood

Jacobsons on Beechwood

Red House Honey as Jacobsons Gourmet Concepts Raw Honey

Red House Honey as Jacobsons Gourmet Concepts Raw Honey

The label describes this fabulous product in Red House Honey’s own unique words ….

Our all-natural honey is made by hand without the use of electricity: hand-cranked out of our Lega Italian extractor, then hand sieved and bottled. It remains as pure as it was in the hive: unpasteurized, with no preservatives, pesticides or additives.

Visit Jacobsons to purchase some today and don’t forget, honey loves cheese!

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Darling, it’s delightful: growing lettuce in November….in Canada.

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Red House Honey Cold Frames

Red House Honey Cold Frames:  Lettuce In November!

@redhousehoney06 #redhousehoney

Are you enjoying your own nutritious, home-grown veggies, harvested outdoors, right in the middle of a Canadian winter. We are!
Lettuce in November might sound fanciful unless you live in California. Here in Cardinal, Ontario, on the Canadian shores of the St. Lawrence River, that’s just impossible unless you have a big, expensive greenhouse. Or is it?
Check out Red House Honey’s cold frames, made from local Ontario cedar, and some former Red House window glass. Outside, as the song goes, darling it’s frightful, but inside the cold frames, oh, it’s so delightful.
Here’s how:
Construct cold frames using Niki Jabbour’s great cold frame plans (http://yearroundveggiegardener.blogspot.com or check out her book, The Year Round Vegetable Gardener).
Put some newspaper on the bottom, then fill about half full with good, enriched soil. Around late August, depending on how far north you are, seed lettuce, onions, spinach, beets, parsley and other quick-growing, cold-weather-loving plants. By early October they should be ready to eat, if not before. When frost is forecast, close the lids. They’ll need a small amount of water, but not too much since condensation will likely occur and keep the soil moist.
Open the lids on warm sunny days; close them at night. When it is quite, frosty, keep lids closed.
Once the really cold weather hits, they won’t grow much more, but you can keep them in statis for a good while. Plant carrots, parsnips and other veggies even earlier and you can harvest them all winter long. Just pile the snow (or hay bales or other cover if there isn’t much snow) on top of the cold frames and they’ll be very snug. Low light levels inhibit growth so once the days grow short, the growing is pretty much done.
Red House Honey STILL has veggies growing in our open zone five gardens–Russian kale, parsnips, carrots, onions and garlic, as well as some parsley and mint. (We have floating row covers but are too lazy to use them.)
Why eat vegetables that have been on a truck for thousands of kilometres? Here’s to enjoying your healthy, home-grown veggies!

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Honey + Yoga = Ayurveda

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Sunrise on the river

Sunrise over the St. Lawrence

contact@redhousehoney.ca   #redhousehoney

If you practise yoga you’ve probably heard about ayurvedic medicine, a natural form of healing with ancient, even mystical roots. Ayurveda is a Hindu system of healing based on the idea that illness is caused by imbalances in the body. Diet and lifestyle modifications are thought to have an important impact on well-being and in warding off disease and mental and physical debilitation.

Honey and ghee (clarified butter which is heated, then has the whey skimmed off) are two important substances in ayurvedic healing.

Natural, unpasteurized honey promotes self-healing via the immune system and because of its anti-biotic and anti-bacterial properties, can be eaten and spread topically to hasten healing of minor ailments, cuts and bruises. This is especially true if you consume honey which has been made in your local area, from indigenous flowers and plants. Honey contains pollen and if you have allergies, consuming pollen from your local area helps to raise antibodies in your immune system, making it better able to react when necessary.

Here are some great, quick remedies to try next time you are feeling under the weather, or just want a quick pick-me-up:

Mom’s Hot Toddy:
My mother used to give me this drink whenever I was feeling poorly, and I swear it works.
Fill a cup with hot water. Add a shot of whiskey, a teaspoon of lemon and another teaspoon of honey. Mix well. Sip at leisure before bed. Great for those colds that wake you up at night.

Honey and Cinnamon:
Mix one tablespoon of honey with one-quarter teaspoon of cinnamon. Nibble on this straight from the spoon or mix into yoghurt, cereal or tea. Repeat for three days. Great for bad colds. Daily use of honey and cinnamon strengthens the immune system and is believed to ward off viral and bacterial infections.

Black Pepper and Honey:
Add a pinch of black pepper to a teaspoon of honey. Lick from the spoon after meals. Great for severe coughs with mucous.

Let us know your honey cures! Write to us at contact@redhousehoney.ca, and don’t forget to like us on Facebook!

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