Canadian honey better than antibiotics!

Image

@redhousehoney06 #redhousehoney
Raw Canadian buckwheat and clover honey is better than antibiotics. Just as good as Manuka honey in fact. What’s more, this little-known fact was established in 2009, according to research done by the Canadian Therapeutic Honey Project. Headed by Dr. Katrina Brudzynski of Brock University’s Department of Biological Sciences, the project tried to find out the level antibacterial activity of Canadian honey, as well as establish a standard production procedure that would lead to pure, sterile medical-grade honey of the highest antibacterial activity. The project was so successful that a US pharmaceutical company wanted to get involved in producing and marketing Canadian honey for therapeutic purposes. But guess what? They chose New Zealand Manuka honey instead because it was farther along in the industrial development and marketing process. Once again, Canada lost out despite our great products and great potential.
Instead, we get to purchase imported Manuka honey at an astronomical price, thinking it is somehow better than our own great honey — all be cause of savvy New Zealand & US pharmaceutical marketing.
In fact, Dr. Brudzynski has continued to do research into the amazing properties of honey. She is the founder of Bee-Biomedicals which manufactures anti-viral anti-inflammatoryt topical therapies using honey and propolis. She and her colleagues have isolate and chemically synthesized a compound known as caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) from propolis extracts which, according to her Brock University web profile, “showed potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, CAPE exhibited selective cytotoxicity toward undifferentiated cells such as breast cancer cells; MCF-7 and MDA-MB-435 (Brudzynski et al, 2005), and against progenitor/stem cells of regenerating limb (Brudzynski and Carlone, 2004).”
Dr. Brudzynski’s exciting collaborative research has also showed that “CAPE transiently delayed reconstruction of missing limb by blocking cellular dedifferentiation and formation of progenitor cells (Brudzynski and Carlone, 2004).”
She adds that “Our studies on the influence of dietary propolis extract (containing naturally occurring CAPE) on diabetic mice showed a protective, anti-inflammatory effect on insulin-secreting beta cells. It also caused hypoglycemia (Brudzynski and Brudzynski, 2005).”

In collaboration with members of Department of Chemistry, we have isolated and chemically synthesized a compound from propolis extracts, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (Brudzynski et al, 2005). CAPE showed

In the 2009 study, Dr. Brudzynski and her team looked at specific pollen source plants which yielded the highest rate of anti-bacterial compounds in the honey. The team looked at 178 honey samples from across Canada to determine which pollen sources had the highest rate of anti-bacterial compounds.

Bees in their winter bee barn

Bees in their winter bee barn


Honey sourced from
the pollen of clover (Trifolium sp.), buckwheat (Fagopryum esculentum), and Blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) had the highest anti-bacterial compounds.
Phase two of the project used these findings, working with University of Western Ontario’s Clinical Microbiology Lab. Anti-bacterial honey compounds were tested on patients exhibiting a
resistance to conventional anti-bacterial treatments. Honey samples taken from six different varieties of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) coming from different geographical regions in Canada and two varieties of clover (Trifolium sp.) treated the bacterial infection more efficiently than the usual treatment using penicillin and tetracycline.
The project was so successful in field examinations and clinical trials, researchers began to try to find ways to produce and regulate Canadian honey as a therapeutic agent, in other words, as medicine. Prof. Brudzynski began talking to a British Columbia company but despite the clinical success the company declined to get involved. A US pharmaceutical company was also very interested but it decided to work with Manuka Honey in New Zealand which had more advanced production and industrial implication testing.
What does it all mean? Canada’s honey is as good as the highly touted and extremely expensive Manuka honey which we import from the other side of the world. Why don’t we get behind a Canadian product which can benefit Canadians directly – economically, medically and clinically through expansion of research into this area?
The project wrapped up in 2009 but new projects are looking at the shelf life of honey as a therapeutic agent, and the antioxidant properties of honeys from different pollen sources.
Project funding came from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Adaptation Programming, administered by the Agricultural Adaptation Council. Read more at http://adaptcouncil.org/testimonials.php?id=3l8s8f8g7p6f and http://www.brocku.ca/mathematics-science/departments-and-centres/biology/people/katrina-brudzynski.

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.

Related Images:

Feliz Navidad y feliz ano nuevo from Red House Honey

Image

Bees in their winter bee barn

Bees in their winter bee barn

Red House In Winter

Red House in Winter

@redhousehoney06 #redhousehoney

Winter at Red House Honey is a magical time. The great ships of the St. Lawrence pass by adorned with Christmas lights. Sunlight dances along the hoar-frost covered branches and grasses of the forests and fields. The Galop Canal weir behind the Red House slowly begins its transformation from paradise for fish, fowl and furred creatures into a glittering white winterscape…that is, when the wind is not blowing straight down the river bringing an unholy chill.

Milkweed, frosted

Milkweed, frosted

When the Northwest wind begins to blow, all creatures great and small–the chickadees and fox, the beavers, mink and martins, the deer, and even the and wolves across the river on Galop Island head for cover. The bees hunker down in their bee barn and everyone waits for the return of the sun that brings warmth, growth and more honey. It is truly a marvel how Mother Nature uses winter to conceive and incubate before giving birth once again to a glorious summer.
Here’s to 2014! Red House Honey will be in Peru, checking out the honey situation. Hope your Christmas and New Year is a wonderful time with family and friends, love and good health. Feliz Navidad y felix ano nuevo!

Ship in the sunrise

Ship in the sunrise

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.

Related Images:

WHAT’S IN YOUR HONEY? MEET THE HONEY DETECTIVE

Image

#redhousehoney @redhousehoney06
Not sure about the quality of your honey? Call the honey detective.

Prof. Vaughn Bryant at work

CSI: Pollen Detective: Gardenista.

Prof. Vaughn Bryant is a melissopalynologist (pollen analyst) at Texas A &M University has one of the world’s few pollen testing laboratories which can successfully analyze honey pollen and indicate where the honey has come from. He can tell if honey labelled “local” or “raw” really is. That is, if the honey hasn’t been ultra-filtered to disguise its origins — usually somewhere in Asia (especially China or India). Ultra-filtering (or “honey laundering,” which uses heat, watering down and application of high pressure) means there is no pollen left. No pollen means the product is no longer honey. And that means you just spent a lot of money to buy what is essentially syrup, containing few nutrients, no healthful ingredients and a lot of empty calories. Real, raw, unpasteurized honey is a totally different product. Be discerning. Be a detective. Investigate your honey sources and always BUY RAW!
For more information click on the link above.

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.

Related Images:

Raw Honey: No, it doesn’t come out of a little plastic bear

Image

@redhousehoney06 #redhousehoney

Bees in Winter

Bees in Winter

Raw honey. What is it? It’s simple: unheated, unfiltered, unflavoured, unpasteurized and straight out of the hive. Honey does not need to be heated, filtered, flavoured or otherwise tampered with. At Red House Honey, we take the honey straight out of the hive, extract it by hand, sieve out the wax and put it in a bottle. Then we bring it to you. That’s all.

Why do people think honey needs to be filtered? It doesn’t. This removes the pollen, which is an integral part of honey. The only time this is done is to disguise where the honey is from, since pollen is a unique identifier. If your honey has been filtered, or ultra-filtered, it probably comes from China or India or has been transshipped from these countries through another Asian one. It likely contains a variety of frightening chemicals and pesticides.

Why do people think honey needs to be pasteurized? It doesn’t. Honey never spoils UNLESS it has been taken from the hive before bees have capped it off (added a layer of beeswax). Bees only do this when the honey has reached the ideal moisture content of 18%. Don’t ask me how they know. Don’t ask me how they make honey either.  Let’s just say it’s a miracle and leave it at that. Honey should NEVER be heated. This destroys the anti-bacterial, anti-microbial, anti-everything properties that we covet in raw honey.

Why does honey granulate? Honey granulates over time but this isn’t a problem. Natural sugars in the honey begin to clump together. Put the jar in a bowl of warm (not hot) water and it will melt a little. Or just enjoy it as it is. There is absolutely nothing wrong with it.

Why do people add stuff to honey? No idea. There’s nothing better than pure, raw honey to take care of aches and pains, colds and allergies and even help you sleep and, some say, lose weight. I eat too much honey to lose weight eating it, but I’m certainly willing to give it a try. Beware of adulterated honey. Some firms add corn syrup, flavourings and other nasty things to their honey. Don’t be fooled. Buy only raw, artisanal honey. Like Red House Honey.

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.

Galop Canal under frost

Galop Canal under frost