RHH Donates to Manotick Project for Haiti during March/April

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Haitian Children

Haitian Children

#redhousehoney During March and April Red House Honey will donate a portion of the proceeds from honey sold at The French Cafe in Manotick to the Manotick Project for Haiti (MPFH).  MPFH funds and oversees various community projects in Haiti including schooling, nutrition and uniforms for children (including many orphans), repair of community buildings, skills training and start-up funding for small business owners on a case-by-case basis.

Run by Grace Agostinho, owner of The French Cafe, the project began six years ago as a result of destructive hurricanes in Haiti. These disasters were soon followed by a devastating earthquake, and then a cholera epidemic.

MPFH relies solely on private donations for funding.

Manotick Project for Haiti Volunteers With Haitian Children

Manotick Project for Haiti Volunteers With Haitian Children

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Haitian Child with Melon

Haitian Child with Melon

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Bee Lazy: How you can help keep our bees buzzin’!

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Bees in Winter

Bees in Winter

#redhousehoney Stop weeding your lawn and garden…and help Red House Honey’s bees survive the winter (and make more honey)!

Red House Honey bees are still buzzing’ in their winter bee barn, after a long, cold winter that is nowhere near over. Successive cold and snowy days with temperatures of -10 C. and below are taking their toll on the brave honey-makers, but we are confident they will pull through. Early plant sources of nectar and pollen will be vital. It may be mid-to late July before they are able to produce any significant amount of honey.

Everyone can help honey bees.
No matter how small your plot, we encourage everyone to grow and nurture plants inimical to bee well-being. It could be as simple as NOT weeding your lawn and garden! Those so-called weeds you’ve been pulling out are actually some of the best sources of nutrients for bees (and for making honey or raising brood). Dandelion pollen and nectar is most often used by bees for raising brood, which starts to happen so early in the season that most flowering plants and trees are not in bloom yet. Clovers, particularly alsike clover, and early-flowering trees such as apples, are fabulous for making honey.
Along the garden path.Milkweeds produce nectar all through the day, not just in the morning, so are vital for bees. Asters, goldenrod and thistles also bloom late in the season when other nectar and pollen sources have withered and died, and so are vital to allowing bees to build up sufficient stores to get them through the winter. So get out there in your garden, and bee lazy!
For more information, see www.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_American_nectar_sources_for_honey_bees

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