Elvis Lives at Prescott Farmers’ Market

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Elvis Lives at Prescott Farmers’ Market. Click here to see…Elvis Live!

Elvis was alive and shakin’ at the Prescott Farmers’ and Crafters’ Market last Saturday, to help celebrate the market’s official opening. Wearing his trademark spangled jumpsuit and white shades, The King performed many of his greatest hits, from “Suspicious Minds” to “In the Ghetto” to a crowd of appreciative onlookers.

Red House Honey was honoured to be able to present Elvis (a.k.a  Kirk Francois) with some authentic soil gleaned from the grounds of Graceland.

Ray’s Reptiles also put on a great show, with reptiles and a petting zoo. Added to the festivities were fiddle music, face painting and of course all the dedicated and talented Farmers’ and Crafters’ Market vendors.  Thanks to Kevin Hutt for organizing and to everyone else who helped out to make it a great and memorable opening day. Kudos to Brenda Steinburg of B’s Bubbles for her great Elvis video and photos.

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RHH Hives Ready to Go for Spring

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Cleaning out the overwintered hives

Cleaning out the overwintered hives

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The hive is buzzing with activity! A small nucleus of bees made it through the winter and a ramping up for spring. We’ve added pollen patties, a rich feed which stimulate hive growth as the queen begins to lay eggs — up to 1,000 per day. As the dandelions and other florals begin to open, the bees will be buzzing around the neighbourhood collecting pollen, nectar and pine pitch for their busy hive-building activities. Any day now, we will receive our three new ‘nucs’ (small colony of worker bees and a mated queen) which will help us build up our apiary to its former strength. Hello honey!

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TreeAzin, Emerald Ash Borer treatment, toxic to bee brood

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Of course, there is more bad news for bees. This from the Ontario Beekeepers’ Association:

TreeAzin, the treatment most frequently recommended for this pest, is a tree-injected systemic which can be very toxic to bee brood. The label makes it clear that it should not be applied until after the blooming period – which in Ontario would be mid to late June – and also recommends not applying more frequently than every two years.

So, before you think about treating your ash trees with this chemical, please, check with your REGISTERED pesticide applicator AND your municipality.

Our neighbourhood has  been absolutely decimated  by the Emerald Ash Borer. Whole forested areas are now denuded.  How can we strike a balance  been preservation and extermination of pests?

Your thoughts are welcome….

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