The Permaculture Revolution Begins!

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Another glimpse at the ongoing work in our field. We are rejuvenating a disused area with an irrigation pond and swales. Once fenced, this area will be used for livestock and other permaculture activities, including growing watercress along the pond banks. Exciting!

Pond with Duck Island

Pond with Duck Island

 

Swale

Swale

 

Digging irrigation ditches and a pond

Digging irrigation ditches and a pond

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The Honey is Flowing

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The honey has started to flow! After anxious months of waiting and watching, peekig inside to check on the bees’ progress in making honey, we have finally taken some of their ambrosia and bottled it.
The process was both easier and harder than anticipated.

Bee on a Bachelor's Button

A Bachelor’s Button is perfect for a bee


On a slightly overcast Friday evening, we crept up to the hive and removed two frames fom the hone super, brushing off hundreds of hard-working honey bees who were rather dedicated to their task They buzzed a little angrily, but resignedly all the same. “It’s them! They are going to take some of our honey. Oh well, let them, we can make more,” seemed to be the general feeling.
Placing the frames in a tub, we hurried over to our neighbours’ house, where they had set up an extraction laboratory in their garage. After uncapping the honey comb with an uncapping fork (which looks a lot like a canine coat-stripping comb) It was placed in the hand-cranked, two-frame extractor (which is really just a large, stainless steel centrifuge with holding racks inside) and cranked for several minutes. Then the frames are rotated inside the drum, and cranked again, to extract the honey from the other side.
Finally, the golden liquid is poured off by opening the honey gate (a spigot at the bottom of the tank) and poured over a double sieve into large bowls.
From the bowls, the strained honey is poured into clean jars, labelled and is ready to go!
The golden nectar sits our counter, proudly bearing the Red House Honey label. Alas, only about two kilos were collected this time, and it is all spoken for. Watch our site for news of our next honey production dates and subsequent availability, probably around the end of July.